Complexity Explorer Santa Fe Institute

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Game Theory I - Static Games

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Tutorial Videos

Download tutorial videos here.

References
There are a variety of game theory books available that range from popular science to highly technical mathematics. Here are some references that span the spectrum.

Online References
• Khan Academy Tutorials: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/microeconomics/nash-equilibrium-tutorial

Economics Textbooks
Since game theory is so fundamental to modern microeconomics, many economics textbooks give detailed treatments of game theory. Undergraduate level textbooks that require little or no calculus are:
• Pindyck, R., Rubinfeld, D., Farnham, P. G., Miles, D., Scott, A., and Breedon, F. (2009). Microeco-nomics, 8th Edition. Pearson Education, Inc Chapter 13
• Nicholson, W. and Snyder, C. (2005). Microeconomic theory. South Western/Thomson Chapter 8
• Varian, H. R. (2014). Intermediate Microeconomics: A Modern Approach, 9th edition. WW Norton &Company Chapter 29 and 30
The graduate level economics based textbooks include:
• Mas-Colle, A., Whinston, W., and Green, J. (1995). Microeconomic theory. Oxford university pressChapters 7-9
• Jehle, G. A. (2001). Advanced microeconomic theory. Pearson Education India Chapter 7

Game Theory Textbooks
There are a litany of game theory books where the technical requirements vary not just between books but also within books. However, here are some of the classics that you can expect to encounter in any game theory course:
• Fudenberg, D. and Tirole, J. (1991). Game theory. MIT press Cambridge, MA

• Tadelis, S. (2013). Game theory: an introduction. Princeton University Press

• Osborne, M. J. and Rubinstein, A. (1994). A course in game theory. MIT press